Only Word Check uses the preferred Australian English spelling. Other sites use American or British English. Check your spelling using Australian English spelling.

Word Check - Australian Dictionary
Now with spelling suggestions and a link to definitions.


Friday, May 22, 2015

Is the spelling alot or a lot?

I read this rather interesting article today and the final line caught my attention.

http://www.businessinsider.com.au/why-the-editor-of-the-macquarie-dictionary-just-said-charity-fk-in-front-of-thousands-of-people-2015-5

"And finally, Butler would like you all to know that “a lot” – as in “I like you a lot” – is TWO words, not one."

Those of you who follow my work will know the dictionary files I create are prescriptive. Why? Simple. I simply want people to be able to easily find the single spelling most people consider correct. We are presented all the time with choices with spelling and I think it is simply easier to use the preferred Australian English spelling rather than a secondary variation.

Now here's the problem with the statement. If we are to accept usage is what determines should or shouldn't be included in the dictionary, then surely the word "alot" should now be included as a secondary variation for the words "a lot". Yes it is an error, but based on usage, around 20% of the population use the spelling "alot".

When referring to a dictionary make sure you read the important tips which let you know a little more about the entry. A word may be slang, colloquial, commonly used in speech, or a secondary variation. These clues are invaluable when using a dictionary.

Given that my work is about creating the best prescriptive spellcheck dictionary for Australians, I do however agree that the spelling is not "alot", at least at this point in time.

Kelvin Eldridge
www.Australian-Dictionary.com.au
The preferred Australian English spelling.

Thursday, May 7, 2015

As I was reading about the term MX it occurred to me just how powerful words can be.

I was reading the following article about the MX possibly being included in the next edition of the Oxford English Dictionary.

www.smh.com.au/world/gender-neutral-mx-may-be-added-to-oxford-english-dictionary-20150506-ggvsg1.html

The article states "The gender neutral honorific pronounced mux, will be an alternative to the traditional Miss, Mrs, Ms".

What occurred to me as I read the article that fighting for titles for equality appears  not to solve a problem, but to be to be part of the problem. Titles or salutations aren't really necessary and often they're used in ways that...well, is far from ideal.

Perhaps it's time to think about whether or not titles or salutations are necessary at all.

Kelvin Eldridge
www.Australian-Dictionary.com.au
The preferred Australian English spelling.