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Thursday, May 28, 2020

Is the spelling sanitizer or sanitiser?

The main time I tend to use hand sanitiser, or is that hand sanitizer, is when I’m on a cruise before I eat. I’ve also used it when visiting people in a hospital, or in an aged care facility. It makes sense.

However, now with COVID-19, all that has changed and now it becomes part of your regular routine.

The question then is, is the Australian spelling with the ‘s’ or the ‘z’?

A check of Google for sites ending in .au for the words sanitiser and sanitizer, returns 1.19 million results for the ‘s’ spelling and 464,000 for the ‘z’ spelling.  A check of the Australian Oxford Dictionary and the Macquarie Dictionary for the words sanitise and sanitize, gives us sanitise with the ‘s’ as the primary spelling and sanitize with the ‘z’ as the secondary spelling.

In Australia the preferred spelling uses the ‘s’ for the word sanitiser and its various forms.

Kelvin Eldridge
www.Australian-Dictionary.com.au

Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Question received regarding how often the dictionary files are updated and the upgrade policy.

I received two questions recently regarding the dictionary files I produce. I thought the questions were very good and I wanted to share the answer with everyone.

The questions were:

How often are the files updated?

What is the upgrade policy?

Now in my ideal world I'd have lots of people purchasing the dictionary files which would enable me to put in the time required to release regular updates. Ideally, I wanted to make the updates free for anyone who had purchased the files.

Unfortunately my ideal world and reality don't match very well. I understand that people won't understand the time involved in finding and researching the words I include or exclude from the dictionary files. Each word is reviewed, but some words reviewed can take quite a long time to review. The time involved is considerable.

For this reason it's not viable for me to simply provide free updates. The time to update the documentation and the files packaged as zip files also takes some time.

To be frank, the money from sales each year would not cover the time involved each year.

For this reason, at this stage, I feel the best approach is for people to purchase the current release for the relatively small cost. The package received is better than anything else currently available in my humble opinion. Then in a couple of years time, if there's sufficient changes to the newly released files, people are then welcome to purchase the new release. Those benefiting from the work I do are then contributing to the ongoing development.

When a new release is available I will send out an email to everyone who has purchased the relevant files and let them know the update is available. Whether they purchase the update or not is entirely their choice.

In terms of how often the updates occur I have no clear answer, but I would say for the actual packages I sell it would be a number of years. It's is currently nearly four years since the last update was released.

Word Check, which is the online tool available to everyone for free, is updated regularly with new words added (a few have been removed), as I find words and research the words to see if the words should or shouldn't be included.

I hope this answers the questions for anyone who is interested.

Kelvin Eldridge
www.Australian-Dictonary.com.au


Thursday, February 13, 2020

Is the spelling barbeque or barbecue?

Australia Day is a day to relax and have friends over for a barbeque, or is that barbecue?

A search using Google for sites ending in .au, returns around 3.7 million results for barbeque and 17.3 million results for barbecue. Microsoft Word allows both barbecue and barbeque as valid spellings.

The Oxford and Macquarie dictionaries list barbecue as the primary spelling and barbeque as a secondary spelling. The Macquarie dictionary notes there’s greater use of the secondary spelling barbeque in Australia, than there is in the US or UK.

The preferred spelling in Australia is barbecue. Now there’s something to ponder whilst grilling the snags on Australia Day.

Kelvin Eldridge
www.Australian-Dictionary.com.au
The preferred Australian English spelling.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Is the spelling financer or financier?

Whilst editing a document recently I noticed the spelling financer and financier in the same paragraph. I couldn't help think is this a difference in usage, or perhaps a spelling issue.

Checking the Macquarie and Australian Oxford dictionaries there is no mention of financer, but financier is included in both dictionaries. Checking online dictionaries including the Merriam Webster (American), Oxford (UK) and Collins, none include financer. The only online resource to include financer was Wiktionary, but as Wiktionary isn't a reliable authoritative resource, you need to take care putting any credence on whether or not it is a correct spelling.

Microsoft Word's spellchecker marks both financer and financier as correctly spelled words, which is one reason people may inadvertently use financer and think they've used the correct spelling, when they really should have used the word financier.

A check of Google for Australian sites (sites ending in .au) produces 872,600 results for financier and 42,700 for financer.

As there is no reference in any of the authoritative references to the spelling financer, this would tend to lead us to accept financer is a spelling error and financier is the correct spelling.

Kelvin Eldridge
www.Australian-Dictionary.com.au
The preferred Australian English spelling.

Friday, December 13, 2019

Is the spelling ANZAC, Anzac, or anzac?

The word ANZAC is an acronym for the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. An acronym expectedly consists of the capitals for each word. Interestingly, we also have Anzac, which has an initial capital to refer to people, places, or other uses, other than the specific Corps. For example Anzac Day, Anzac biscuits and the Anzacs.

Spelling the word anzac using only lower case is a spelling error.

Interestingly, in Microsoft Word if you misspell ANZAC, the capitalised version will not be suggested, but only the version with the initial capital. In fact Microsoft Word will even autocorrect a misspelled capitalised variation of ANZAC, to be the word Anzac, with the initial capital letter.

Kelvin Eldridge
www.Australian-Dictionary.com.au
The preferred Australian English spelling.

Thursday, November 21, 2019

Is the spelling nightime, nighttime, night time, or night-time?

A common issue with spelling is whether two words should be put together without a space (known as a compound word), include a space, or the words hyphenated. Sometimes words evolve over time starting as separated, then hyphenated and finally joined together.

A check of Google for Australian sites ending in .au, returns 1.76 million results for nighttime, 3.88 million results for night time (which includes night-time) and 101,000 for nightime.

Nightime should be considered a spelling error, but it is used for Codral Nightime Cold and Flu tablets, where misspelling a word is common in branding and marketing situations.

The compound word nighttime is a US spelling. In Australia the spelling is not listed in either the Macquarie dictionary or the Australian Oxford dictionary, so nighttime should be considered a spelling error in Australia.

The Macquarie dictionary lists night-time as a noun, with no reference to night time. The Australian Oxford dictionary also only lists night-time, again with no reference to night time.

I have to say I didn’t see that coming. The correct spelling for Australian usage is night-time with the hyphen.

A quick review of the first 100 sites for “night-time” shows only 30% of sites use the correct spelling, many using both night time and night-time in the one article which is considered an error. Given the number of people using the spelling nighttime, nightime and night time, it is conceivable that 80% or more of writers are using the incorrect spelling for Australia, according to the Macquarie and Australian Oxford dictionaries.

With Microsoft Word, if you enter nighttime Microsoft Word will mark nighttime as an error, but suggest both night time and night-time, which could easily lead writers to use the wrong spelling for Australia, depending on what they mean to write.

Kelvin Eldridge
www.Australian-Dictionary.com.au
The preferred Australian English spelling.

Monday, October 21, 2019

Microsoft Outlook does not correctly spellcheck flavor when in the subject field.

Recently I was sending an email using Microsoft Outlook and to my surprise, the incorrect spelling flavor was not picked up as a spelling error. In fact the correct spelling flavour was marked as a spelling error in the subject field.


If typing flavour in the body of the email message the spelling was correctly handled as the correct spelling for Australia and flavor was correctly marked as a spelling error.

It really is hard to believe after so many decades of Microsoft Outlook being available, there's still errors in the code. In this case the spelling language was set to Australian English. The body of the message is spellchecked correctly, but the subject field is checking the text entered against American English.

To get around this issue and check the spelling correctly, copy the subject text into the body of the email, check the text is spelt correctly, then cut and paste the text into the subject field. That way you know you're getting the text spellchecked using the selected language.

Kelvin Eldridge
www.Australian-Dictionary.com.au
The preferred Australian English spelling.